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Can you apply too much Humate?

Can you apply too much Humate?

People will also ask if it’s possible to apply too much humic acid to the lawn and the answer is no. You won’t harm the lawn with too much humic acid but for sure, you will waste it. In other words, throwing down more than the labeled rate will not hurt anything, but it certainly is wasteful and expensive.

What does Humate do for plants?

All three Humate components work together to dramatically increase a plant’s nutrient absorption and overall health. This locally-sourced soil-activating treatment stimulates growth in beneficial microbes who work to unbind vital nutrients from the soil so they can be moved closer to the root zone.

Will Humate help clay soil?

Humate reduces the clay content and compaction levels in soils. Humate builds healthy organic matter in soils. Humate allows water to penetrate clay soils easier.

When should I spread humate?

Apply humate and water a lawn deeply if it is heat or drought stressed. We strongly recommend applying Humate when transplanting trees. Always apply multiple applications of Humate if the soil in the lawn is “dead” and the soil is being reclaimed to a living soil.

Is humate the same as humic acid?

If we take the flocculated humic acid and dry it down to form a black mass that can be crushed and sized by dry sieving, we have humate. In other words, humate is humic acid in its solid state. Therefore, the chemical properties of humate and humic acid are basically the same.

What does Humate do to soil?

Humate reduces the clay content and compaction levels in soils. Humate builds healthy organic matter in soils. Humate allows water to penetrate clay soils easier. Humate increase in the lawn’s soils capacity to retain water.

What is Humate made of?

Potassium humate is the potassium salt of humic acid. It is manufactured commercially by alkaline extraction of brown coal (lignite) Leonardite to be used mainly as a soil conditioner. The extraction is performed in water with the addition of potassium hydroxide (KOH), sequestering agents and hydrotropic surfactants.