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Can diabetes cause blood blisters?

Can diabetes cause blood blisters?

It’s rare, but people with diabetes can see blisters suddenly appear on their skin. You may see a large blister, a group of blisters, or both. The blisters tend to form on the hands, feet, legs, or forearms and look like the blisters that appear after a serious burn.

Can diabetes cause blisters on your feet?

Bullosis diabeticorum (diabetic blisters) — In rare cases, people with diabetes develop blisters that resemble burn blisters. These blisters—called bullosis diabeticorum—can occur on the fingers, hands, toes, feet, legs, or forearms. Diabetic blisters usually are painless and heal on their own.

Why do people with diabetes get blisters on their feet?

The fungal infection Candida albicans is another common cause of blisters in people who have diabetes. You’re more likely to get diabetic blisters if your blood sugar levels aren’t well controlled.

What happens if you have a blood blister on your foot?

Diabetes also can lower the amount of blood flow in your feet. Not having enough blood flowing to your legs and feet can make it hard for a sore or an infection to heal. Sometimes, a bad infection never heals. The infection might lead to gangrene.

Can a diabetic blister heal on its own?

Diabetic blisters are relatively rare but reports on how often they develop vary. Blisters typically occur in people who do not control blood sugar well. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without treatment.

Why do people with diabetes get ulcers on their hands?

There are several reasons why diabetes raises your odds of getting ulcers. One of the main symptoms of diabetes is high blood sugar (also called blood glucose). Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage your nerves and blood vessels. That lessens blood flow (especially to your hands, feet, and limbs),…

The fungal infection Candida albicans is another common cause of blisters in people who have diabetes. You’re more likely to get diabetic blisters if your blood sugar levels aren’t well controlled.

Diabetic blisters are relatively rare but reports on how often they develop vary. Blisters typically occur in people who do not control blood sugar well. They are painless and tend to heal on their own without treatment.

There are several reasons why diabetes raises your odds of getting ulcers. One of the main symptoms of diabetes is high blood sugar (also called blood glucose). Over time, high blood sugar levels can damage your nerves and blood vessels. That lessens blood flow (especially to your hands, feet, and limbs),…

When to see a dermatologist for diabetic blisters?

Given the risk of infection and ulceration when you have diabetes, you may want to see a dermatologist to rule out more serious skin conditions. Diabetic blisters usually heal in two to five weeks without intervention, according to an article in Clinical Diabetes.